Tuesday, June 4, 2013

TwD: Savarins with Rhubarb & Elderflower Compote


Today´s recipe for the Tuesdays with Dorie group is Savarin. The recipe for this French classic from the Lorraine region. was provided by contributing baker David Blom.




I never made a Savarin until tempted by a ring mold in my favorite kitchen supply store last year. This was a cake pan I have always wanted to own, and Savarin, the rich, yeast-leavened dough, baked until golden and then soaked in syrup, is one of those simple French creations that endures. Although we really liked the look of a larger Savarin, I also bought smaller Savarin molds to be able to make individual Savarins, as typically French Savarins are made in individual servings.

For this recipe and to bake small individual servings, you will need  small Savarin molds or so-called Baba molds. Alternatively, you could use any other small Bundt molds.




In order to bake a Savarin, you will have to prepare a classic Baba dough sans the raisins, by mixing together water, yeast, sugar, an egg, flour and unsalted butter, then leave to rise for about 20 minutes in a warm, draught-free place. You butter the individual Savarin molds, and spoon the dough into the molds – they should be three-quarters full. Leave the Savarins in a draught-free spot to prove.a second time. When the dough has come up to the rim of the molds, you bake them for 15 minutes until puffed, crisp and golden.




While the dough is rising, you prepare your soaking syrup. The syrup can be made just with sugar and water, as this recipe calls for, but you can also prepare it with citrus fruit, or you can try it with other flavors, such as jasmine tea, orange flower water or syrup flavored with liqueur. I prepared and Elderflower Soaking Syrup (Holunderblütensirup) and used the juice of one blood orange, sugar, water and freshly picked elderflower blossoms from our garden. I boiled the liquids until they have reached syrup consistency and then strained the syrup.




When the Savarins are fully baked, turn them out onto a cooling rack, let cool, then place them over a baking sheet and brush them liberally with the Elderflower Soaking Syrup or let them soak in the syrup.




For the Rhubarb and Elderflower Compote to be served alongside the Savarins, you will need to gently simmer fresh rhubarb, lemon juice, a bit of sugar (to taste) and fresh elderflower blossoms, until the compote has the consistency that you like, then cool the mixture.




Once the Savarins have absorbed the Elderflower Soaking Syrup, you can brush them with pear brandy (as in the recipe) or you can use an Elderflower Liquor (Holunderblütenlikör) for a light summery taste and to complement the Elderflower theme in the soaking syrup as




Serve your Savarins with vanilla ice cream, freshly whipped cream or crème fraîche mixed with a bit of powdered sugar…




… and fresh fruit or a fresh fruit compote, such as the rhubarb compote, making a lovely dessert from simple ingredients…




…and do not forget to garnish with fresh elderflowers from your garden.and impress your guests with this fabulous French syrup-and liquor-soaked, retro classic.

To see all the individual interpretations of the other members of the Tuesdays with Dorie group, please click here.



42 comments:

  1. I have a savarin pan that I have never used. I love your miniature ones...they are perfect for this recipe. Your compote sounds wonder with the little desserts. I smiled to myself at what elderberry is called in German...I never would have figured that one out.

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    1. Karen, isn´t the name for elderflowers just wonderful in German...seriously, it is a bit long and complicated but I adore the taste of these flowers, they gave a wonderful taste not only to the soaking liquid but also to the compote and the elderflower liquor was another delicious and harmonious touch. Just the way we like it.

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  2. Looks so delicious and light.. Perfect for Spring and summer

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    1. Thank you very much, this was a very nice dessert and it tasted wonderful with the late red rhubarb (also called "strawberry rhubarb") and the delightful elderflower syrup and liquor.

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  3. Absolutely lovely, Andrea! The elderflower liquor sounds delightful. I'm running behind (again) and haven't made this one yet but look forward to trying it soon.

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    1. You will really enjoy this recipe when you get a chance to make it - these savarins are so easy to make and they taste wonderful with the rhubarb and elderflower compote, syrup and liquor - thanks so much for commenting!

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  4. Dear Lioness,
    this is indeed a beautiful, lush feast for the eyes. Are those Lily of the Valley?

    Xxx

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    1. Thank you for the lovely comment - no, these lovely white flowers are not Lily-of-the-Valley (which happen to be some of my very favorite flowers) but the very fragrant flowers of the elderberry bush which is in full bloom in our garden right now.

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  5. Oh Andrea - how beautiful
    I have a bottle of elderflower liqueur that I am never sure what to do with. (I also have a bunch of rhubarb in my fridge). I am going to have to come up with something to pair these flavors. I can't wait to try the idea out.

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    1. Cher, thanks for your kind comment - I am certain that you will put the elderflower liquor and the rhubarb to a really delicious use but this recipe for the compote and the soaking liquid is pretty delicious, you might want to try adding a bit of that liquor to the soaking syrup and the compote instead of adding the blossoms themselves.

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  6. Beautiful! The rhubarb and elderflower sounds amazing.

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    1. Thank you very much - the combination of elderflowers and rhubarb tastes fabulous - that is if you like the very fragrant elderflower blossoms.

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  7. Another beautiful post! Now I just need to track down some of those molds. I love the thought of a rhubarb and elderflower compote. How very elegant! Thank you so much for sharing, sweet friend.

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    1. Monet, thank you so much, if you are interested in these molds, they can be found online, just look for "savarin or baba mbaking molds" - I found them (in great quantity) at a company that carries baking equipment to restaurants and bakeries.

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  8. Your mini savarins are so pretty and summery. I wish I had thought of elderflower - I have a bottle of cordial waiting to be used.

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    1. Thanks for the comment - I am sure that there will be a savarin making an appearance on your table soon, so you might want to use your elderflower cordial then.

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  9. Andrea, you have once again produced amazing looking and sounding baked goods. Elderflower and rhubarb sound like a great alternative to the classic berries. We also had fun with this recipe, as you say it's a retro classic, but retro made well can be very, very good.

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    1. Thank you, yes, it is berries all around these days and, of course, they are really good right now but since we have a huge elderflower bush in our garden and I found some wonderfully dark pink rhubarb at the market, I decided to take the rhubarb and elderflower route and the savarin was really delicious served that way.

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  10. Looks beautiful with the rhubarb and I love the addition of elderflower.

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    1. Sandra, thanks for the comment - elderflower and rhubarb is indeed a nice combination.

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  11. You have so many wonderful tins! I love your mini versions, plus the rhubarb compote is a marvelous accompaniment!

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    1. Liz, so many baking pans and so little time - I never seem to be able to use all of the pans but I am seriously trying...rhubarb & elderflower compote is one of the most delicious compotes I ever made and it paired so well with these individual savarins.

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  12. Beautiful as always Andrea. Your version sounds quite delightful.

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    1. Cathleen, thank you very much - glad that you like my version with the elderflower soaking syrup, rhubarb & elderflower compote and elderflower liquor - they were truly delicious that way!

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  13. The only thing with elderflower here is the jam, and it´s amazing. I never knew you could make syrup with the flowers from a plant in your garden, sounds wonderful Andrea! And beautiful savarins too! It turns out I have some mini baba molds but I have never used them.

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    1. Paula, elderflowers are just amazing, I have to agree with you there, while they are in season, I cannot ever get enough of them and will be making a few more cakes and compotes and cordials with the last ones I can find this week.

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  14. This looks wonderful! The cake is so pretty and golden Andrea, love this version! Perfect for a very fancy occasion or a simple get together!

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    1. Chris, we really enjoyed those little savarins and I really liked baking them, I loved that recipe!

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  15. Your mini savarins are adorable! They sound like a bit of work, but the finished product looks wonderful.

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    1. beth, thanks so much, it seems that in baking all things small are just wonderful!

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  16. Oh, bu this post just sends me. I love savarin. and one does not see them often anymore. Your elderflower syrup sounds like such a nice addition. I have never made it, and I am quite curious. Thanks for another artful post.

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    1. Adri, thanks so much, I just know that you would adore the taste of elderflowers, they add such a delicious taste to all kinds of dishes and the elderflower fritters that I am making this weekend make me so very happy and always remind me of my beloved grandmother who used to make them every late spring for us. All they need is a final dusting of powdered sugar, truly extraordinary!

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  17. I am just amazed by this post! It is wonderful -- if we gave first prize - you should win! :)

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    1. Catherine, you are so very kind - it is nice to read that you enjoyed this post!

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  18. Lucky you my friend,
    Fresh rhubarb is rarely seen here,
    i think i'm happy with jarred version...

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    1. Thank you very much my friend, rhubarb is a wonderful vegetable (not a fruit) to use for baking and for making utterly delicious fruit compotes.

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  19. You have have lots of baking dishes and supplies. :) I recently bought donut and madeleine pans but I still have to buy different kinds of mold like this! The shape does matter for the dessert recipes. :) Very pretty dessert, Andrea! Do you eat dessert like this everyday?? I'm very, very jealous!

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    1. Nami, no, not everyday but often - and when we do we always, always skip dinner. There are so many lovely treats to be baked that I can never resist a really tempting recipe but all in moderation and if possible with as much fruit as possible.

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  20. Guten Abend, Andrea :-)
    What a great idea to visit TWD blogs around midnight and have an irresistible impulse to run and open the fridge :-) (PS: I could resist not to!)
    Well done, your baby savarin looks so elegant and delicious. Did I mention how much I love rhubarb!
    All the best and good night.

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    1. Carola, thank you for the nice comment - rhubarb is one of the most wonderful spring vegatables - used as such and for sweet baking. It tastes wonderful and tart and it also reminds me of my grand-mother´s baking.

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    1. Colette, I am sure that you would love them!

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